10 Twitter Tips For Traditional Media

It seems like Twitter is finally starting to penetrate the mainstream media. CBC recently invited some experts in social media in to share their ideas about how a traditional media company might use tools like Flickr, YouTube, Facebook… and Twitter. While I wasn’t there, it sounds like it was a big success and got people excited to dig in and use these new tools as part of their show programming.

Twitter even seems to be replacing blogs as the ‘cool’ go-to news source for ‘what’s happening on the web’. However, many mainstream media companies are still clearly struggling with what Twitter is and how to best use it.  So I’ve put together my personal…

10 Twitter Tips For Traditional Media (try and say THAT 10 times quickly…)


1. Twitter is NOT an RSS feed.

I know that the New York Times, The Globe and Mail, CBC, and others are using Twitter as a news feed, but I don’t personally subscribe to any of them. I can get that EXACT same information from an RSS feed (which I do…) and I don’t personally like my Twitter feed clogged up with every news item under the sun.


The results are interesting: @NYTimes has over 13,000 followers with this strategy, @globeandmail has just under 800 followers, and @CBCNews has over 2,400 followers. Both the Globe and CBC are using Twitterfeed, which means that they’re automatically sending out Tweets from their RSS feed.


To me, Twitter’s best use is not as a one-way push of information. Rather…


2. Twitter is about creating value for the people who follow you.

What is it that’s unique about Twitter compared to other social media tools? That you can communicate directly with your audience and they can connect back to you. If you’re just using Twitter to drive people back to your own website, or to listen to radio, or to watch your TV shows, you’re not going to get much value of out it.


You need to think like an audience member – ask yourself why they would want to follow you. Ask yourself what you can provide that would be of value to a true fan of your programming. And then give it to them.


Don’t be afraid to link to sources outside your own site (usually a big no-no for media companies).


Don’t be afraid to tell people what’s going behind the scenes.


Get creative and think about creating value.


If you do, your followers will spread the word to their own networks, growing your influence significantly.


3. Twitter is about creating relationships.

Relationships are two-way streets. You can’t talk all the time and expect everyone else to just sit and listen.

 

So ask questions.

 

Reply back to some of the people who are following you – show them you’re paying attention.

 

Proactively follow people who are writing about you, but aren’t yet following you.

 

You CAN learn a lot from your followers – they clearly have an interest in what you’re doing, so perhaps they’re Tweeting about some of the same things you are… even (gasp), things you might not already know about.

 

And remember – valued relationships aren’t temporary. You need to be a regular and consistent presence. You can’t just do it for three weeks for a special project and then drop off the face of the earth. If your program is seasonal, try to find a way to continue to Tweet while you’re off the air or in repeats.

 

The bonus of an ongoing relationship is that you’re building loyalty, you’re staying relevant, and you’re creating an army of supporters who, again, will champion you to their own networks.

 

4. Twitter can be used for Citizen Journalism

Working a news story and need to flesh it out, but don’t have the perfect contacts? Ask your Twitter followers.

 

Getting early reports about breaking news, but need more details? Canvas your followers to see if they know anything.

 

Don’t have any pictures or video of a news event? Ask your followers if they have any, or see if any of them are nearby and can go get some.

 

Twitter is also a great source for story leads. People are following you for a reason. They are interested in the subject matter you work in and Tweet about. They’re far more likely than the average person to be passionate about that subject matter and even have ideas and leads for stories that could be valuable to your company.

 

So why not ask for their ideas?

 

Ask them whether there are stories that you’re missing that are important to them. Ask what songs your radio station should be playing that aren’t on the playlist?

 

And if you DO follow up on the ideas, make sure to let all your followers know – they’ll love you for it, because THEY helped contribute to YOUR success. And they will tell others…

 

5. Twitter can be used for feedback

Want to know what people think of your newscast? Your website? Your 8pm drama or your 9pm sitcom? Your on-air branding campaign? Your coverage of the election?

 

Ask your followers!

 

They’re the most devoted audience members you’ll find and because they’re following you, it’s very likely that they do want you to get better and are comfortable providing their thoughts. All you have to do is ask them.

 

You could even start by asking them how you can improve at your use of Twitter! (@sparkcbc did this and got some great tips…) Most of the feedback from people who are following you will be thoughtful and constructive.

 

If you want the other side of the coin (and you SHOULD), then don’t forget to set up an RSS feed to find out what people who AREN’T following you are saying about you at search.twitter.com!

 

6. Twitter can be used for public opinion sampling

As was done in both the Canadian and American elections, Twitter can provide INSTANT updates on public opinion (in a completely unscientific way). It’s the internet version of doing ‘streeters’ or ‘man on the street’ interviews. Short opinion bites, coming a broad variety of people, all on the same subject.

 

There are two ways to approach this: first, to ask your followers for their opinions, and second, to use search.twitter.com for the subjects you’re covering.

 

By using Twitter in your traditional media coverage, you’ll attract more attention to your own Twitter account and drive up the number of people following you.

 

7. Twitter can be used for branding

This is a horrible pun, but today, it’s not ‘You Are What You Eat’. It’s ‘You Are What You Tweet’. (sorry)

 

What you post about regularly becomes a big part of your brand to your followers.

 

So think long and hard about what you do and don’t want to post. Think about your tone, too.

 

For your followers, what you Tweet may define you more strongly than your on-air programming or traditional media content.

 

8. Decide On Your Author

Who’s writing your Tweets? Is it the same person all the time? Is it a variety of people? Do you want the public to know who is writing for you, or do you want everything to come from “Generic Media Company?” These are important questions to answer.

 

If, for example, you’re a TV or Radio program, is it your host Tweeting? It is a fictional character from your show? It is a producer? I would always vote for something that feels personal over something that feels impersonal.

 

@sparkcbc is using the staff’s initials to signal who wrote the Tweet (ie: what do you think about our show? /ny). @cbcradio3 is writing the person’s name in the Tweet (ie: Lana wants to know….).

 

If you want to establish a relationship, people need to know there’s a human on the other end of the conversation. And if you do decide on a single or short list of people who are using Twitter, make their names part of your Twitter profile so the author information is obvious to new followers.

 

9. Follow The People Who Are Following You

When people follow you, they’re inviting you into a relationship. They’re saying :

“You’re creating value for me with your Tweets and I’d like to stay in touch with what you’re saying.”

Even if it’s common courtesy and that person isn’t necessarily creating value for you, I think companies should follow everyone who follows them. It feels GOOD when someone or a show that you admire follows your updates. It creates a bond – a one-on-one bond that is impossible to replicate in a broadcast.

 

***This tip does not apply if the person following you is a spammer (identify a spammer by looking at their follow vs following stats – if they’re following 1,000 people and only 2 are following them, odds are VERY good they’re spamming)

 

10. Use Twitter For Branding Disaster Alerts and Customer Service

Look at the Motrin example I’ve previously written about. Their potential customers were horribly insulted by a new ad campaign, but Motrin wasn’t on Twitter to find out about it – even though #motrinmoms was the #1 search term on Twitter for many days.

 

Many smart companies are using Twitter accounts as customer service desks. If anyone complains about Comcast in a Tweet, @comcastcares finds out about it and initiates contact with them very quickly, attempting to solve their problem. It’s a personal touch, it’s responsive and not reactive, and it can be the difference between winning over skeptics vs losing control of your brand.

 

That’s my list. What have I missed?

Which media companies are using Twitter well and which ones aren’t?

 

And should media companies ALWAYS follow everyone who follows them?

52 Comments

  1. Mortgage Guy
    December 2, 2008

    Twitter is about spontaneity and self creation. Looks like many Internet marketers are using calculated, cold messages to push through a menu of objectives and sales. I

    Reply
    • Sdwe
      December 10, 2010

      It is good to read your post. I thank you to help making people more aware of possible issues. Great stuff as usual.

      Reply
  2. Mortgage Guy
    December 1, 2008

    Twitter is about spontaneity and self creation. Looks like many Internet marketers are using calculated, cold messages to push through a menu of objectives and sales. I

    Reply
  3. Danny Brown
    December 2, 2008

    This is a great list for traditional media to follow when it comes to Twitter. We’re so concerned about how it can benefit social media strategies that we forget how it can also help traditional mediums.

    Thanks for this info, well worth anyone’s time.

    Reply
  4. Danny Brown
    December 1, 2008

    This is a great list for traditional media to follow when it comes to Twitter. We’re so concerned about how it can benefit social media strategies that we forget how it can also help traditional mediums.

    Thanks for this info, well worth anyone’s time.

    Reply
  5. Steve Pratt
    December 2, 2008

    Thanks, Danny – very kind of you!

    Reply
  6. Steve Pratt
    December 1, 2008

    Thanks, Danny – very kind of you!

    Reply
  7. Zach
    December 2, 2008

    Great stuff! I frequently use Twitter to complain when having problems with a company, partially to vent, partially in hopes of someone from the company reads it. While the venting is great, I’m yet to hear from a company’s representative.

    Reply
  8. Zach
    December 1, 2008

    Great stuff! I frequently use Twitter to complain when having problems with a company, partially to vent, partially in hopes of someone from the company reads it. While the venting is great, I’m yet to hear from a company’s representative.

    Reply
  9. Steve Pratt
    December 2, 2008

    Kind of shocking that it’s so easy to find out when people are complaining about your company, but that so few are doing it. @buzzbishop has a good post about how Starbucks responded to his tweet quickly here: http://cyberbuzzmedia.wordpress.com/2008/11/17/listening-to-your-brands-conversation/

    Reply
  10. Steve Pratt
    December 1, 2008

    Kind of shocking that it’s so easy to find out when people are complaining about your company, but that so few are doing it. @buzzbishop has a good post about how Starbucks responded to his tweet quickly here: http://cyberbuzzmedia.wordpress.com/2008/11/17/listening-to-your-brands-conversation/

    Reply
  11. Kat Tancock
    December 2, 2008

    Good overview. I agree about the RSS thing: Twitter is for curated links (selected for their value by those I follow), not for traffic-driving. Brand- and relationship-building have just as much relevance, if not more, than simply driving people to your site.

    Reply
  12. Kat Tancock
    December 1, 2008

    Good overview. I agree about the RSS thing: Twitter is for curated links (selected for their value by those I follow), not for traffic-driving. Brand- and relationship-building have just as much relevance, if not more, than simply driving people to your site.

    Reply
  13. You really should learn something new everyday (espcially if you are job searching) « The Galley .
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    […] on MySpace. Let’s say I start on Twitter and read an article one of my followers posted, like 10 Twitter Tips for Traditional Media. From there I’ll click on related links and end up reading about creative ways people have […]

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  14. Jen Harris
    December 2, 2008

    My number one rule about Twitter: It is what you make it.
    If you want it to be your RSS feed, so be it.
    If you want it to be your customer service outlet, so be it.
    If you want to converse with your customers about how to make a proper PB&J, so be it.
    The RSS issue: There are so many different options.
    Are you the pusher? Are you the receiver? Are you a receiver of the pusher & have a decent following yourself to which your readers are expecting relevant info from you?
    You can see how it can get dizzying of which rules to follow.
    1. If you are the NYT – yes, you can push me your TwitterFeed (good info for my followers, IF the NYT are the first to report it (not likely anymore!)
    2. If you are a local media outlet. Contribute to the conversation 50/50, don’t just push. You will be welcomed with open arms (yea, welcome to the conversation) & then questioned (who are you? do you have a voice?) & then dropped (yes, we know about the roll-over on the interstate, I was there & Tweeted it out 3 hours ago-old news!).
    Listen to your followers, have your followers be an ear to the ground for you. Know what is going on in your local Twitterverse – host (that means pay for drinks) a TweetUp, you will win a lot of new viewers, followers & readers.
    3. If you are an individual contributer w/in a traditional media source-a reporter if you will…be more engaged, don’t push a TwitterFeed because it is old news and most important, be you.

    Traditional media has a lot to learn from social media. Magazines are going by the way side because what they print is old before the ink dries, newspapers are loosing tons of money because they don’t know how to engage their readers and local TV is for local feel good stories about your rockin’ football team (go BSU!). 🙂

    Sorry for the long post, but I am very passionate in teaching this very thing. The walls must come down & accept what is happening to our news sources and how it is is being delieverd. The quicker they can adapt the better information will get.
    -jen

    Reply
  15. Jen Harris
    December 1, 2008

    My number one rule about Twitter: It is what you make it.
    If you want it to be your RSS feed, so be it.
    If you want it to be your customer service outlet, so be it.
    If you want to converse with your customers about how to make a proper PB&J, so be it.
    The RSS issue: There are so many different options.
    Are you the pusher? Are you the receiver? Are you a receiver of the pusher & have a decent following yourself to which your readers are expecting relevant info from you?
    You can see how it can get dizzying of which rules to follow.
    1. If you are the NYT – yes, you can push me your TwitterFeed (good info for my followers, IF the NYT are the first to report it (not likely anymore!)
    2. If you are a local media outlet. Contribute to the conversation 50/50, don’t just push. You will be welcomed with open arms (yea, welcome to the conversation) & then questioned (who are you? do you have a voice?) & then dropped (yes, we know about the roll-over on the interstate, I was there & Tweeted it out 3 hours ago-old news!).
    Listen to your followers, have your followers be an ear to the ground for you. Know what is going on in your local Twitterverse – host (that means pay for drinks) a TweetUp, you will win a lot of new viewers, followers & readers.
    3. If you are an individual contributer w/in a traditional media source-a reporter if you will…be more engaged, don’t push a TwitterFeed because it is old news and most important, be you.

    Traditional media has a lot to learn from social media. Magazines are going by the way side because what they print is old before the ink dries, newspapers are loosing tons of money because they don’t know how to engage their readers and local TV is for local feel good stories about your rockin’ football team (go BSU!). 🙂

    Sorry for the long post, but I am very passionate in teaching this very thing. The walls must come down & accept what is happening to our news sources and how it is is being delieverd. The quicker they can adapt the better information will get.
    -jen

    Reply
  16. Steve Pratt
    December 2, 2008

    Don’t apologize for a long post – this is a great comment! I do agree with you that Twitter is whatever you make it and that ultimately, there are no ‘right’ ways to use it – it’s whatever works best for you. One rule I forgot that you bring up – traditional media first and foremost needs to just do it: get on Twitter, experiment, and learn how to use it in a way that works for them and their audiences.
    Thanks again, Jen – awesome stuff.

    Reply
  17. Steve Pratt
    December 2, 2008

    Don’t apologize for a long post – this is a great comment! I do agree with you that Twitter is whatever you make it and that ultimately, there are no ‘right’ ways to use it – it’s whatever works best for you. One rule I forgot that you bring up – traditional media first and foremost needs to just do it: get on Twitter, experiment, and learn how to use it in a way that works for them and their audiences.
    Thanks again, Jen – awesome stuff.

    Reply
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  19. John
    December 2, 2008

    Are you making fun of my Twitter skills?

    Right now aside from the Radio3 feed I am not really using Twitter to follow media – just for friends, so I don’t know this RSS push thing. But, since you and I get our RSS elsewhere when and where we want it, I’d be pretty turned off by seeing duplicates dumped into my Twitter.

    Is Twitter going to replace the blog? What with people being two busy and all.

    And here I was just thinking about starting a Slow Blog.

    Reply
  20. John
    December 2, 2008

    Are you making fun of my Twitter skills?

    Right now aside from the Radio3 feed I am not really using Twitter to follow media – just for friends, so I don’t know this RSS push thing. But, since you and I get our RSS elsewhere when and where we want it, I’d be pretty turned off by seeing duplicates dumped into my Twitter.

    Is Twitter going to replace the blog? What with people being two busy and all.

    And here I was just thinking about starting a Slow Blog.

    Reply
  21. Anna
    December 2, 2008

    Thanks for this post. We try to use some of these tactics for our NewsHour Twitter http://twitter.com/newshour but like everyone else are experimenting with what works best for us and how our followers react.

    We do import our RSS feed but we also try to get breaking and interesting news on Twitter faster than we post it on our site. That means that it’s usually the people who write the stories that appear on the site who post to our feed and respond to our followers.

    We’re always interested in hearing suggestions about how we should handle Twitter. Just @reply and we’ll get back to you.

    Reply
  22. Anna
    December 2, 2008

    Thanks for this post. We try to use some of these tactics for our NewsHour Twitter http://twitter.com/newshour but like everyone else are experimenting with what works best for us and how our followers react.

    We do import our RSS feed but we also try to get breaking and interesting news on Twitter faster than we post it on our site. That means that it’s usually the people who write the stories that appear on the site who post to our feed and respond to our followers.

    We’re always interested in hearing suggestions about how we should handle Twitter. Just @reply and we’ll get back to you.

    Reply
  23. Matt
    December 2, 2008

    I like the idea of Twitter, and want to use it at my workplace. I work for a small market CBS affiliate and want to get the News Department staff involved as a way to promote or tease what we are covering for the day, get involved personally with our viewers, or even look for new story ideas. My question is, how easy is it to have more than one user on one account? We would want our viewers to see first, who the company is, and second, who the publisher is. Your tip on keeping it more personal is a great idea, I’m just worried that Twitter isn’t built for multiple users on one account. Any Ideas?

    Reply
  24. Matt
    December 2, 2008

    I like the idea of Twitter, and want to use it at my workplace. I work for a small market CBS affiliate and want to get the News Department staff involved as a way to promote or tease what we are covering for the day, get involved personally with our viewers, or even look for new story ideas. My question is, how easy is it to have more than one user on one account? We would want our viewers to see first, who the company is, and second, who the publisher is. Your tip on keeping it more personal is a great idea, I’m just worried that Twitter isn’t built for multiple users on one account. Any Ideas?

    Reply
  25. Steve Pratt
    December 2, 2008

    Hey Matt,
    Twitter definitely isn’t built for multiple accounts, but lots of people are finding creative ways to work around it.
    Generally, I would use the company / show as the ID on the Twitter account and for the graphic, but would use the bio area to talk about who is writing – even it’s acknowledging that it’s a team and there’s not enough room to list all the names. Even though it compromises the 140 character limit, you can work who’s writing the post into each Tweet. I’ve seen CNN’s @rachelmaddow use this, saying something like “Producer X here – big guest on tonight”.
    At CBC Radio 3, we’ve got our bloggers and on-air hosts all using the same account and self-identifying when they post.
    Ideally, Twitter would allow for multiple user accounts and solve your problem, but for now, these a few of the best ‘hacks’ I’ve seen. Good luck with it!
    Steve

    Reply
  26. Steve Pratt
    December 2, 2008

    Hey Matt,
    Twitter definitely isn’t built for multiple accounts, but lots of people are finding creative ways to work around it.
    Generally, I would use the company / show as the ID on the Twitter account and for the graphic, but would use the bio area to talk about who is writing – even it’s acknowledging that it’s a team and there’s not enough room to list all the names. Even though it compromises the 140 character limit, you can work who’s writing the post into each Tweet. I’ve seen CNN’s @rachelmaddow use this, saying something like “Producer X here – big guest on tonight”.
    At CBC Radio 3, we’ve got our bloggers and on-air hosts all using the same account and self-identifying when they post.
    Ideally, Twitter would allow for multiple user accounts and solve your problem, but for now, these a few of the best ‘hacks’ I’ve seen. Good luck with it!
    Steve

    Reply
  27. Steve Pratt
    December 2, 2008

    One more note for Anna and Matt – awesome to see you both commenting here as representatives of the media.
    To know that both a small market CBS affiliate and the NewsHour with Jim Lehrer are both coming up with Twitter strategies AND posting comments on blogs talking about Twitter is hugely encouraging.
    The only way to figure out new tools like this is to dig in and get your hands dirty experimenting, so kudos to both of you!

    Reply
  28. Steve Pratt
    December 2, 2008

    One more note for Anna and Matt – awesome to see you both commenting here as representatives of the media.
    To know that both a small market CBS affiliate and the NewsHour with Jim Lehrer are both coming up with Twitter strategies AND posting comments on blogs talking about Twitter is hugely encouraging.
    The only way to figure out new tools like this is to dig in and get your hands dirty experimenting, so kudos to both of you!

    Reply
  29. Claire Carlton
    December 3, 2008

    Hi Matt
    really pleased to see this artcile. Am new to twitter and using it to promote WWF and Earth Hour climate change campaign and hopefully really get people inspired to take action in fun ways. trying to turn the boring politics of climate change into something that people want to engage in.
    Any way was glad to read that twitter is best not to be used as RSS and I also will only follow those that also follow others and engage in dialogue.
    For me I see twitter as a prefect way to have dialogue with people but it seems that many use it as a podium. I am finding that even if I do tweet people because I see that have twittered something of interest most do not respond back. But DM’s seem to be a better way to engage people in dialogue.
    My aim is to build relationships with people to broaden the support network and start to attract those people who want to do something but not sure how – you more of the NOW people.
    My other challenge is to get the traditional media campaign people within my organisation to understand the real benefits of social networking. Will check out your recommended reading and any other tips you can offer would be great.
    Currently I twit as me @purplefreedom and for @earthhour.
    I work for WWF International in the Climate Change Team as manager of http://www.panda.org/climatewitness.
    We are gearing up for a huge year with Earth Hour and my personal mission is to engage millions in doing more than just switching off their lights for Earth Hour as I believe in people power and that the internet is the way to go even to capture people in developing countries.
    Love to hear your thoughts regards Claire
    PS: great site BTW

    Reply
  30. Claire Carlton
    December 2, 2008

    Hi Matt
    really pleased to see this artcile. Am new to twitter and using it to promote WWF and Earth Hour climate change campaign and hopefully really get people inspired to take action in fun ways. trying to turn the boring politics of climate change into something that people want to engage in.
    Any way was glad to read that twitter is best not to be used as RSS and I also will only follow those that also follow others and engage in dialogue.
    For me I see twitter as a prefect way to have dialogue with people but it seems that many use it as a podium. I am finding that even if I do tweet people because I see that have twittered something of interest most do not respond back. But DM’s seem to be a better way to engage people in dialogue.
    My aim is to build relationships with people to broaden the support network and start to attract those people who want to do something but not sure how – you more of the NOW people.
    My other challenge is to get the traditional media campaign people within my organisation to understand the real benefits of social networking. Will check out your recommended reading and any other tips you can offer would be great.
    Currently I twit as me @purplefreedom and for @earthhour.
    I work for WWF International in the Climate Change Team as manager of http://www.panda.org/climatewitness.
    We are gearing up for a huge year with Earth Hour and my personal mission is to engage millions in doing more than just switching off their lights for Earth Hour as I believe in people power and that the internet is the way to go even to capture people in developing countries.
    Love to hear your thoughts regards Claire
    PS: great site BTW

    Reply
  31. Ashwini Prabha
    December 4, 2008

    Hi Claire
    Just checking out twitter and what it involves, would love to learn more from you as you seem to be digging deeper into this and will be our expert soon 🙂
    Open to learn and utilise new ways of communicating …
    ash

    Reply
  32. Ashwini Prabha
    December 4, 2008

    Hi Claire
    Just checking out twitter and what it involves, would love to learn more from you as you seem to be digging deeper into this and will be our expert soon 🙂
    Open to learn and utilise new ways of communicating …
    ash

    Reply
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  34. Teri Conrad
    March 4, 2009

    Hey Steve,
    Great article (and great blog site in general!) I totally agree that it’s important to just dive in. This topic came up the other day on Twitter and I suggested that its really about transparency and generosity.
    The way I utilize Twitter is to build my connections, and the greatest thing about it is I end up dealing with people who already like me! It’s a wonderfully powerful tool that way!
    Thanks again for great post!
    Cheers!
    tlchome

    Reply
  35. Teri Conrad
    March 4, 2009

    Hey Steve,
    Great article (and great blog site in general!) I totally agree that it’s important to just dive in. This topic came up the other day on Twitter and I suggested that its really about transparency and generosity.
    The way I utilize Twitter is to build my connections, and the greatest thing about it is I end up dealing with people who already like me! It’s a wonderfully powerful tool that way!
    Thanks again for great post!
    Cheers!
    tlchome

    Reply
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  50. gold coast hypnosis
    February 16, 2011

    The Facebook friends of Tahrir Square will do nothing more than furrow the mud of Egypt’s traditional society. But they must be good for something. Here’s one idea: have the army draft them all, and send them to the villages to reach reading. …

    Reply
  51. maria
    November 26, 2011

    Excellent outline of what Twitter really is all about..

    Reply

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