Lock It Up In A Walled Garden VS. Set Your Content Free! – Old Rules VS New Rules For Media Part 2

This is the second in a series of posts contrasting the ‘old’ rules of the media and the ‘new’ rules that are necessary for success in today’s rapidly changing digital landscape.

Old Rule #2: Viva La ‘Walled Garden’ – You Must Use The Content From Media Companies In The Way THEY Want You To Use It

Traditional broadcasters pay for their content and they want you to experience that programming in the way that makes them the most money back on their investment. Some of the most profitable ways to consume content may not be the most convenient for audiences, but old media doesn’t care – they own it and they will try to force you to do what is convenient for THEM. Because they can. Or least, they COULD.

New Rule #2: Set Your Content Free – Don’t Force Audiences To Come To You.  Go To Where It’s Convenient For THEM.

Most traditional companies want to keep all their content within their own garden walls so they can control it, measure it, and monetize it. But that doesn’t work anymore (unless you’re the 800 lb gorilla in your content niche).

Why?

To grow audiences and to stay relevant, media companies have to reach audiences where they are – and they are all over the place.

There is a legacy of self-importance that assumes that audiences have to come to the media company to get content because that’s the way it’s been for a long time.Suddenly, though, audiences have some choice in the matter.

If a media company chooses to restrict access to their content, two ‘new’ results can occur.

One, someone will pirate their content and simply put it up where it’s most convenient for others to consume. Audiences will be happy and media companies will have lost total control over their own content.

Two, because there is no scarcity of content creators or distribution channels anymore, if your content isn’t convenient or easy to find, audiences will simply find other content to consume that IS convenient.

The media needs to make it easy and convenient for audiences to discover its content. So put it on Facebook, put it on YouTube, put it on Flickr, etc. Give up some control to empower the audience to discover you, consume your content where THEY want to and then share it when they like it.

Not only will you grow the number of people who consume your content, but you will gain authenticity and loyalty for truly trying to make life easier for audiences.

Are there good reasons to keep your content ONLY on your site?


Who is doing a good job of setting their content free?

 

Related Links:

Rule #1 – Define Yourself By Content, Not By Your Distribution Platform


12 Replies to “Lock It Up In A Walled Garden VS. Set Your Content Free! – Old Rules VS New Rules For Media Part 2”

  1. Amen to that! I’ve always hated Walled Gardens. Each one eventually comes tumbling down. Even Facebook will eventually fall.

    One of my favourite dev blogs has a great post about this:
    http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000898.html

    The perfect online social platform would be something that sets up multiple different programs. (eg instead of FaceBook a service that sets up and configures Flickr, Blogger, Twitter, and Youtube or Zoomr, GeeksWithBlogs, Blellow, and Vimeo).

  2. Amen to that! I’ve always hated Walled Gardens. Each one eventually comes tumbling down. Even Facebook will eventually fall.

    One of my favourite dev blogs has a great post about this:
    http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000898.html

    The perfect online social platform would be something that sets up multiple different programs. (eg instead of FaceBook a service that sets up and configures Flickr, Blogger, Twitter, and Youtube or Zoomr, GeeksWithBlogs, Blellow, and Vimeo).

  3. Take-away lesson?

    Content producers cannot be lazy when it comes to creating quality content, execution and delivery. Survival of the fittest. Be as attentive to consumers and engaging with users as budgets allow.

    http://www.sportspsychologytennis.com is a website that does an excellent job of setting content free. It’s starting to add social features to build a community.

  4. Take-away lesson?

    Content producers cannot be lazy when it comes to creating quality content, execution and delivery. Survival of the fittest. Be as attentive to consumers and engaging with users as budgets allow.

    http://www.sportspsychologytennis.com is a website that does an excellent job of setting content free. It’s starting to add social features to build a community.

  5. No one in Canada, yet, is really good at ‘setting their content free’ – at least from the traditional broadcasters/media companies. CBC is making an effort (especially R3) but is constrained by laws/union rules etc.,

    What I find fascinating at the moment is how so many independents (musicians/filmmakers etc) are completely ignoring law and their ‘representatives’ and setting their content free.

    I’m talking daily with musicians (and publicists etc) that don’t care about SoCan or their positions, that don’t care what parliament things, and don’t care about the DMCA – they are freely offering up their music, to me and others – without provisions, or conditions.

    It seems to me that there is a shadow media emerging that is not connected to the traditional or mainstream media. The ‘independents’ banged on the gates for so long that they are just moving on and creating their own media, and building their own audience.

    I think that one day the old guard of Canadian media will wake up and realize that rather than lock the barbarian hordes out, they’ve locked themselves in and by then the ‘hordes’ will not longer care whether the gate is open or closed.

  6. No one in Canada, yet, is really good at ‘setting their content free’ – at least from the traditional broadcasters/media companies. CBC is making an effort (especially R3) but is constrained by laws/union rules etc.,

    What I find fascinating at the moment is how so many independents (musicians/filmmakers etc) are completely ignoring law and their ‘representatives’ and setting their content free.

    I’m talking daily with musicians (and publicists etc) that don’t care about SoCan or their positions, that don’t care what parliament things, and don’t care about the DMCA – they are freely offering up their music, to me and others – without provisions, or conditions.

    It seems to me that there is a shadow media emerging that is not connected to the traditional or mainstream media. The ‘independents’ banged on the gates for so long that they are just moving on and creating their own media, and building their own audience.

    I think that one day the old guard of Canadian media will wake up and realize that rather than lock the barbarian hordes out, they’ve locked themselves in and by then the ‘hordes’ will not longer care whether the gate is open or closed.

  7. I am really at the end of my rope when it comes to Cable TV. They’re really the best example of a whole stream, just not getting it. I thought PVR might be the olive branch that would take me to the next stage, past appointment viewing, but its hardly that all. Now with a filling PVR, I am still watching appointment style with a substandard delivery device that is about as intuitive as a beta VCR.

    I am paying for internet, and TV, and I am at the point where I am really contemplating something that is far more easier, and more convenient for my lifestyle. And that actually works.

    TV Is the walled garden that needs a canyon sized crevice driven into it’s foundation!

  8. I am really at the end of my rope when it comes to Cable TV. They’re really the best example of a whole stream, just not getting it. I thought PVR might be the olive branch that would take me to the next stage, past appointment viewing, but its hardly that all. Now with a filling PVR, I am still watching appointment style with a substandard delivery device that is about as intuitive as a beta VCR.

    I am paying for internet, and TV, and I am at the point where I am really contemplating something that is far more easier, and more convenient for my lifestyle. And that actually works.

    TV Is the walled garden that needs a canyon sized crevice driven into it’s foundation!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *