10 Twitter Tips For Traditional Media

It seems like Twitter is finally starting to penetrate the mainstream media. CBC recently invited some experts in social media in to share their ideas about how a traditional media company might use tools like Flickr, YouTube, Facebook… and Twitter. While I wasn’t there, it sounds like it was a big success and got people excited to dig in and use these new tools as part of their show programming.

Twitter even seems to be replacing blogs as the ‘cool’ go-to news source for ‘what’s happening on the web’. However, many mainstream media companies are still clearly struggling with what Twitter is and how to best use it.  So I’ve put together my personal…

10 Twitter Tips For Traditional Media (try and say THAT 10 times quickly…)

1. Twitter is NOT an RSS feed.

I know that the New York Times, The Globe and Mail, CBC, and others are using Twitter as a news feed, but I don’t personally subscribe to any of them. I can get that EXACT same information from an RSS feed (which I do…) and I don’t personally like my Twitter feed clogged up with every news item under the sun.

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ALERT To Traditional Media

Dear Traditional Media Executive,

URGENT MEMO

The web is NOT primarily a place to advertise your TV programming, your radio programming, your newspaper content, or the latest issue of your magazine.

As a valued and (relatively) YOUNGER audience member that you are craving so desperately, when I decide that I want to experience your brand on a ‘non-traditional’ platform like your website, your Facebook page, your Twitter feed, etc, PLEASE don’t use it for the sole purpose of telling me about all the wonderful things that are on TV, on the radio, in your newspaper, in your magazine, but AREN’T on the web.

I’m choosing to interact with you on the web.  I want a content experience, not an ad. Give me what I want or I will go elsewhere.

Here’s what you’re telling me:

“Thanks for coming my website.  Please leave the web immediately and go to the inconvenient place of my choosing  where I can make more money off of your eyeballs and/or ears.”

Would you watch a TV station whose only programming was ads about great content on the web?  Of course not.  So stop using the web that way.

Sincerely,

Your Future Audience

(P.S. The best way to promote your TV, radio, newspaper, or magazine content?  Let me experience it on the web. If I can have a content experience with your brand on the web and I like it, the odds go way up that I’ll give it a try on another medium.  But if I can’t try it and instead experience the equivalent of a billboard, I’m almost certain to give it a pass…)